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Sonnet Qio MR Professional Universal Media Reader for PC Towers

Qio

Multiple Slots, Quick Input and Output

Qio MR Installed Inside PC Mobile Rack BaySonnet’s Qio MR is a multi-tasking marvel; this is the industry’s first device which supports all major HD video memory card formats in one compact, mobile rack-mounted unit. Qio MR reads from and writes to just about any memory card—P2, SxS, CompactFlash®, SDHC™ and SDXC™, all at high speed. Replacing multiple standalone card readers, Qio MR’s dual P2, SxS, and CF slots enable you to ingest files more efficiently, and the included SD card adapter handles SDHC and SDXC media. Qio MR reads files from any combination of cards with aggregate bandwidth up to 200 MB/sec., much faster than FireWire® or USB 2.0 adapters are capable.

Made for PCMade for Windows PCs

For PC users, Qio MR provides all the capabilities and advantages of the original Qio users have come to appreciate in an easy to install, Windows-compatible package. The Qio MR chassis slides easily into an empty 5.25″ mobile rack (drive) bay, while the included Internal PCI Express Bus Extender PCIe interface card installs into any half- or full-height PCIe slot.

Media cards shown in photos for illustration purposes; not included

Key Features

Replaces Multiple Card Readers—Comprehensive memory card compatibility with support for Sony® SxS; Panasonic® P2; CompactFlash; SDHC and SDXC cards (with included adapter)

Fast—Uses PCI Express® bus interface to deliver superior performance; aggregate bandwidth of 200MB/sec.

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Qio MR with Media Card

Qio MR provides quick ingest of all major HD video memory card formats in one compact, mobile rack-mounted unit.

Media Cards

Qio MR supports a full range of media cards such as (from left to right) Sony SxS, Panasonic P2, CompactFlash, and SDHC cards.

For more information about Sonnet solutions, or to place an order, call (310) 922-1631

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Sonnet Qio: Pro Universal SxS, P2, CF, SDHC, and SDXC media reader for Mac & PC

Qio Professional Universal Media Reader/Writer Plus eSATA Controller

Multiple Slots, Quick Input and Output

Sonnet’s Qio is a multi-tasking marvel; this is the industry’s first device that supports all major HD video memory card formats in one compact, high-performance device. Qio reads from just about any memory card—SxS, P2(2), CompactFlash®, SDHC™ and SDXC™—and external media readers with an eSATA interface, all at high speed. Replacing multiple standalone card readers, Qio’s dual P2, SxS, and CF slots enable you to ingest files more efficiently, and the included SD card adapter handles SDHC and SDXC media. Qio reads files from any combination of cards with aggregate bandwidth up to 200 MB/sec., much faster than FireWire® or USB 2.0 adapters are capable.

Choice of Interface

Qio is available with your choice of a PCIe interface card for desktops, an ExpressCard/34 interface for notebooks, or a Thunderbolt interface adapter (with included Thunderbolt cable) for any Mac with a Thunderbolt™ port. With the purchase of an additional Qio PCIe adapter card, ExpressCard/34 card, or Thunderbolt adapter, you can move your Qio from suite to suite, and then to location and back again without breaking a sweat. No matter where you use it, Qio will quickly become an essential tool in your workflow.

Mac and Windows Compatible

Sonnet’s Qio offers cross-platform compatibility, extending its usefulness on location and in the studio. Whether you’re using a MacBook Pro®, HP Z800 or Mac Pro®, or any Mac with a Thunderbolt port, the Qio fits seamlessly into your workflow.

eSATA Connections

Qio includes four eSATA ports, perfect for connecting media readers with an eSATA interface, such as the RED STATION REDMAG 1.8″ and 2.5″.

Travel and Desktop Companion

This Sonnet pro media reader is small—about the size of three stacked CD cases—and takes up so little space, you can use it just about anywhere. It’s rugged, too—the robust aluminum case easily withstands heavy use. For desktop use, a universal 12V output AC power supply with wall plugs for US, Japan, Europe, UK and Australia use is included. For battery-powered operation, an optional XLR 4-pin adapter cable can route battery power to the Qio. This pro media reader even incorporates a slot for Kensington® and similar security locks to secure the device and deter theft.

Media cards shown in photos for illustration purposes; not included

 

Key Features

Replaces Multiple Card Readers—Comprehensive memory card compatibility with support for Sony® SxS; Panasonic® P2; CompactFlash; SDHC and SDXC cards (with included adapter); XQD (with adapter, sold separately)

Fast—Uses PCI Express® bus interface to deliver superior performance; aggregate bandwidth of 200 MB/sec.

Choice of Interfaces—Qio package includes your choice of interface; PCI Express 2.0 card for desktops, ExpressCard/34 for notebooks, or Thunderbolt for any Mac with a Thunderbolt port

Mac and Windows Compatible—Qio works with in your workflow, regardless the platform you’ve chosen

Built-in SATA Connections—Connect media readers with an eSATA interface

Small and Rugged—Strong aluminum case measures just 5.9″ x 6.2″ x 1.22″

Security—Slot for Kensington and similar security locks to secure the device and deter theft

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Media Cards

Qio supports a full range of media cards such as (from left to right) Sony SxS, Panasonic P2, CompactFlash, SDHC, and XQD (not shown, adapter sold separately) cards.

For more information about Sonnet Solutions, or to place an order, call (310) 922-1631

The Awesome DSLR Features You (Probably) Never Knew Existed

The Awesome DSLR Features You (Probably) Never Knew Existed

The Awesome DSLR Features You (Probably) Never Knew Existed

When compared to point-and-shoot cameras, DSLRs come with the promise of superior image quality and increased shooting flexibility. It’s much more than that, though: many upgrade and completely miss major benefits of using a high-end camera. If you’ve got a DSLR, make sure you know about these features before you take another photograph.

Note: This post discusses a variety of features, many of which fall into the intermediate or advanced category of DSLR user. If you haven’t learned the basics of your DSLR yet and need to familiarize yourself with the terminology, you should check out our Photography Night School course before diving into this article.

Program Mode

The Awesome DSLR Features You (Probably) Never Knew ExistedWhat is it?
If manual and automatic mode had a baby, you’d call it program mode. Like automatic shooting, program mode handles the exposure of the photograph for you. You won’t need to set your shutter speed, aperture, or ISO—terms you should read up on if you’re unfamiliar with them—because the camera will do that for you to ensure you get an acceptably exposed image. While that may sound a lot like automatic shooting, you actually gain more creative control. Your flash won’t engage without your permission, you can set your ISO if you don’t want an automatic choice, you can choose a custom white balance setting, and tell the camera to over or underexpose the image a little bit when necessary.

For an in-depth look at what program mode can do, check out our guide.

What DSLRs have it?
Every DSLR offers program mode.

How can I use it?
Turn the dial (or virtual dial) on your DSLR to the letter P. Some may use a symbol or different marking, but in most cases P represents program mode. From there you can adjust any of the settings mentioned above just as you would in manual mode.

Custom Functions

The Awesome DSLR Features You (Probably) Never Knew ExistedWhat is it?
You can think of custom functions as shortcuts for your DSLR. You can literally change a bunch of settings in an instant with just a turn of your mode dial. You can quickly set aperture, exposure, ISO, the noise reduction mode, color settings, and much more. This feature prevents you from manually changing your settings over and over again. Instead, you just tell the camera what settings you want and it’ll recall them any time you switch to one of the custom function modes.

What DSLRs have it?
We’re talking solely about Canon DSLRs here, but other manufacturers may offer a similar feature.

The Awesome DSLR Features You (Probably) Never Knew ExistedHow can I use it?
Newer Canon cameras store the custom function settings under the menu section that looks like a little orange camera or yellow wrench (usually towards the end of your choices). Others may keep it elsewhere. Either way, find it in your menu and you’ll have three custom function options called C1, C2, and C3. Each of these options corresponds to a similarly named label on your DSLR’s mode dial. Select the one you want to set from the menu, then choose the settings you want to recall when you choose that custom function mode. When finished, you can turn your camera’s mode dial to C1, C2, or C3 and recall the settings instantly. For more information, consult Canon’s official guide.

Depth of Field Preview

The Awesome DSLR Features You (Probably) Never Knew ExistedWhat is it?
When you look through the viewfinder of your camera, you see an approximate frame of what you’re shooting but not necessarily what the photo will look like. Because a lot of choices and settings affect depth of field—which you should read up on if not familiar with the term—and your DSLR doesn’t apply all of those settings until you snap a photo, what you see through the viewfinder isn’t always what you get. Although this may seem weird, if you have a shallow depth of field (meaning only a small part of the image remains in focus) you might find it difficult to compose an image. That said, you’ll often want to know what you’ll get before you press the shutter. The Depth-of-Field Preview gives you a—you guessed it!—preview so you can see what you’ll get through the viewfinder.

What DSLRs have it?
Most DSLRs have a Depth of Field Preview button. Most people forget it exists because manufacturers tend to hide the button on the front of the camera.

How can I use it?
You press the button—after you manage to find it. Most cameras hide the Depth of Field Preview button on the front of the camera near the lens. Because you’ll need your right hand to press the shutter, you’ll likely find that button to the left of the lens. Again, just press it and it’ll do its job.

Picture Styles

The Awesome DSLR Features You (Probably) Never Knew ExistedWhat Are They?
By now you must know Instagram and all its fancy filters. DSLRs, despite their more professional look, decided to cash in on this trend. In some ways it seems kind of silly to have old-school filters on a camera designed to take high-quality photographs, but sometimes these colors adjustments make a great impact. You’ll want to use them sparingly, but you should still consider Picture Styles. At the very least, subtle options like monotone and faded color can produce stunning images under the right circumstances.

What DSLRs have it?
Most popular DSLRs released in the last few years have picture styles, including smaller mirrorless cameras. While you might find this feature under a variety of names, you shouldn’t have much trouble locating it. Even if you have an older camera, you probably have access to a few styles anyway. They not offer the variety of Instagram, but something is better than nothing.

How do I use it?
To use Picture Styles (or whatever your camera calls it), you just need to turn it on and select the style you want. Where you’ll find this option not only depends on your camera’s manufacturer, but often on the camera model as well. Newer DSLRs may have a dedicated button while others require you to go into their menu system to make the change. Either way, you’ll find this feature fast if you look it up in your manual. If you have an older model, look for information on how to shoot in black and white and you should find you various color options. In some cases, your camera may even let you program your own.

Back Button Focus

The Awesome DSLR Features You (Probably) Never Knew ExistedWhat is it?
You already know that your DSLR engages its autofocus mechanism if you hold its shutter halfway. Most of the time you won’t want to focus any other way, but certain circumstances call for a different method. Back Button Focus allows you to press a button on the back of your camera to engage autofocus and use the shutter only for snapping a picture.

Why would you want this? It prevents your camera from refocusing every time you press the shutter which can save you a lot of trouble if you want to maintain the same focal point. Sometimes people can step in front of your images when you shoot quickly and confuse the camera’s autofocus. This can cause you to miss a shot. On the other side, when shooting in a studio you may only need to focus once but recompose your shot. If you don’t want to engage autofocus every time, this can help. Of course, you can just turn off autofocus or hold down your AE lock button to solve this problem another way, but Back Button Focus gives you a hybrid of both. You get autofocus only when you want it, and—presuming your lens supports it—manual focus and a dedicated shutter button the rest of the time.

What DSLRs have it?
Pretty much every Canon DSLR offers this feature because Canon created the feature. Most Nikon DSLRs allow you to enable the same functionality in a somewhat tedious manner. Other manufacturers may include it but not on every camera. Canon cameras often have a dedicated button. Others require you to set an existing (custom function) button for the feature.

How can I use it?
Whether your DSLR offers a dedicated button or requires you to set one yourself, you’ll need to turn on Back Button Focus on most DSLRs. Canon’s Learning Center offers up a cheat sheet of where you can find this feature on many of their popular DSLRs:

EOS Rebel T3: C.Fn 7 (option 1 or 3)

EOS Rebel T3i: C.Fn 9 (option 1 or 3)

EOS Rebel T4i: C.Fn 6 (option 1 or 3)

EOS 60D: C.Fn IV-1 (option 1, 2, 3, or 4)

EOS 7D: C.Fn IV-1 (Custom Controls — Shutter, AF-ON, AEL buttons)

EOS 6D: C.Fn III-5 (Custom Controls — Shutter, AF-ON, AEL buttons)

EOS 5D Mark II: C.Fn IV-1 (option 2 or 3)

EOS 5D Mark III: C.Fn menu screen 2 (Custom Controls — Shutter, AF-ON, AEL buttons)

EOS-1D X: C.Fn menu screen 5 (Custom Controls — Shutter, AF-ON, AEL buttons)

Nikon users should read these instructions, as the process requires some setup rather than just flipping a switch in the DSLR’s settings. Other cameras get pretty specific, so consult your manual for setup information. If you can’t find anything there, a quick web search for “back button focus” plus the name of your camera model should turn up the information you need.

Custom Firmware

The Awesome DSLR Features You (Probably) Never Knew Existed

What is it?
Custom firmware adds features to your DSLR that the manufacturer didn’t add themselves. Most of the time you buy a camera that can do quite a bit more than it lets on. You can unlock that functionality with custom firmware. The downside? Installation may void your warranty.

What DSLRs have it?
Several popular DSLRs from Canon, Nikon, and Panasonic have custom firmware. To find out if your camera has some, check out DIY Photography’s excellent roundup of options.

How can I use it?
How you install custom firmware depends on your DSLR. In most cases, you just load it up like you would an official firmware update. Sometimes this will overwrite existing firmware, but some options (like Magic Lantern, primarily for Canon cameras) only loads itself temporarily (safer but less convenient). Either way, when using custom firmware you run the risk of voiding your warranty and potentially screwing up your camera. Make sure your camera supports the firmware you try to install and that you follow the instructions carefully.


This post covers a variety of cool features most people don’t know about in their DSLRs, but you’ll find many more if you start digging. If you really want to get the most out of your camera, search for something new that you didn’t know about and learn how it works. Your DSLR’s manual covers every little minute detail of its operation, so you have an entire menu of options. You don’t want to end up with a glorified point-and-shoot. Your DSLR offers tons of features, but you can’t use them if you don’t know they exist.

How To Pick A Camera: The Basics You Need To Know

Occasionally, I get asked by friends, family, or colleagues what camera they should get.  On the notion that it’s better to teach someone to fish than give them a fish I am going to try and outline what it is one can usefully think about, when thinking about what camera to buy.  Sure, there are a million articles like this out there, but I wouldn’t be a writer if I didn’t think I could do it better than anyone else, so here goes.

The main thing I’ve noticed is that most people who ask, ask because they don’t know all that much about cameras; enthusiasts tend to see this as a moral failing but in most cases it simply stems from a lack of exposure, to make a feeble pun.  Nowadays most of us make pictures with cell phone cameras (a depressing fact of life of which most camera makers are aware; sales of compact cameras continue to fall every year) and most of us are perfectly happy with the results.  Still, every now and then a person sees a picture that couldn’t have been made with a cell phone, or they see a good camera and wonder what it is they’re missing.

First, the things every photographer thinks about, and that every camera may or may not let you control.

Exposure, aperture, and sensitivity are the three fundamentals of photography.  Exposure is how long the shutter is open; aperture is how wide the shutter is open; sensitivity is how sensitive the film (if you’re using film) or the digital sensor (if you’re using a digital camera) is to light.  That’s it.

fast exposure is used to freeze movement or reduce blur.  A slow exposure is used to let in more light, and get a better picture when light isn’t good.  However, a long exposure will also increase blur, whether from the subject moving, or the camera.  A small aperture lets in less light but gives greater depth of field –this is basically how much of the image is in focus.  For instance, if a person’s face is in sharp focus but the background is blurred (often a desirable effect in portrait photography) the depth of field is shallow, if something in the foreground and something in the far background are both in focus then you have a greater depth of field (which you might prefer for documentary or landscape photography.)

Sensitivity is fixed with film and is expressed by the ASA number; ASA 100 film is not very sensitive while ASA 3200 film can be used for nighttime photography.  In digital photography sensitivity is expressed by the ISO number, and here’s a critical difference between film and digital –with a digital camera you can vary sensitivity of the sensor (with film, you’d have to change film.)  Most modern digital cameras can go anywhere from 1-200 ISO all the way up to five or even six digits, though the high end of any camera’s ISO range is usually solidly in not-great-but-better-than-nothing territory.

Second, digital cameras record images with a sensor.

The sensor of a digital camera is basically a chip with light sensitive photo sites on it –what it does is very simple; it turns light into a digital file.  This is what’s stored on your camera’s memory card, and when you look at a picture on your computer, the computer’s basically reading the file and turning it back into a picture again.  If you look at cameras at all you’ll probably have noticed that the amount of information the sensor can capture is measured in megapixels, or millions of pixels.  The most important thing to remember is that more is not necessarily better –the ultimate effect a given pixel count has on image quality depends on a host of other factors, including the quality of your lens (or lenses), presence or absence of image stabilization, software used by the camera to process information from the sensor, and so on.  Your mileage may vary but unless you’re in the habit of heavily cropping or printing poster size, 12-16MP is more than you’ll ever really need (and in the former case, c’mon, you can frame better than that.)

Sensor size, however, is extremely important.  All other things being equal, you’ll probably want the biggest sensor you can afford and are willing to carry around.  A bigger sensor means better low light performance, and probably less noise (the equivalent of static in the sensor, which shows up as graininess and distorted color) as well.  A bigger sensor also gives you more control over depth of field –if you’re looking at a good camera because you’re interested in getting portraits with the creamy-dreamy blurred background you’ve noticed in pro portraits, you’ll need a bigger sensor (and the right lens, of course.)

The biggest commonly used sensors are so-called full frame sensors, which reproduce the area of a 35mm film negative –superb image quality, but full frame cameras are usually anything from very expensive, to very, very, very, what-the-hell-that-was-the-kid’s-tuition expensive.  A good compromise is to go one step down, to so-called APS-C sensors which are used in many enthusiast, or so-called “prosumer” cameras, or to Micro Four Thirds, which is yet smaller, but still big enough for excellent results in most cases, especially when paired with the right lenses.

Now, if image quality were the only consideration, we’d all be lugging around $3-7000 camera bodies that weigh as much as a Smart Car, with lenses that look more as if they were made by Krupp’s of Essen instead of Nikon.  We’d all be producing sharp, technically impeccable pictures most of the time, with accurate color, under all sorts of lighting conditions.  We’d also all be broke, and unable to pay our chiropracter bills from hauling around thirty pounds of camera gear every time we want to take some happy snaps of the kids at a picnic.  This brings us to Part The Third:

What kind of photographer are you?

For most casual photographers a cell phone camera is all they’ll ever need.  For many, though, a cell phone cam is ultimately too limiting.  Cell phone cameras handle low light very poorly –even today, when they’re better than they’ve ever been –and they focus very slowly, especially in anything other than optimum lighting conditions.  While good photographers can get excellent results with cell phone cameras, they still don’t do very well outside anything other than really good light, with a slow moving or immobile subject, as the plethora of Facebook pictures of unrecognizable people doing who knows what who knows where can testify.  Here’s a necessarily incomplete list of what’s on the street for someone looking to trade up from a cell phone camera.

Casual compacts: small, easy to carry, and the mainstay of casual photography for many years, they’re now being eclipsed by better and better cell phone cameras.  Though convenient, their mediocre optics and tiny sensors mean they’re struggling to compete with the even greater convenience of not carrying an extra gadget at all.  The exception to this are rugged compacts, which are water and shock resistant –some are even suitable for use underwater –which are usable in places where you wouldn’t want to use a phone camera (and which, thanks to improvements in technology, usually take pretty decent pictures for their size and cost as well.)

Who they’re for: Photographers on a very tight budget; people with crappy cell phone cameras.  

Enthusiast compacts:  small, easy to carry, and in general offering noticeably better performance than a cell phone camera; noticeably more expensive too, though.  Many have relatively large sensors and the better ones have excellent optics which allow you to have a really incredible amount of image making power in a pocketable camera.  The most sophisticated have very large sensors (some, like the Fuji X-100S, the Nikon Coolpix A, and the Ricoh GR, have APS-C sensors, which are the same size used in some semi-pro level DSLRs) and are capable of incredibly good results under a wide range of conditions; another hot compact is the Sony DSC-RX100 and RX100-2, which put a large (though not APS-C large) sensor with 20MP resolution in a camera not much larger than a pack of cigarettes.  Though some high end compacts push the limits of pocketability (especially the APS-C sensor cameras, which aren’t really an easy fit in trouser pockets) and can be very expensive (over $1000 in some cases) there are many terrific, genuinely pocketable, smaller-sensor compacts with zoom lenses for under $500, like the very likable Panasonic DMC-LX7. (If you really want the ultimate in image quality in a compact, there’s always the Sony RX1, which puts an honest to God full frame sensor in a pocket sized camera –albeit for nearly three thousand bucks.)

Read More……

Matrox Mojito 4k

4K video monitoring card

Windows

Matrox Mojito 4K offers post-production professionals a fluid editing experience with uninterrupted playback, which lets them see every pixel of every 4K frame in real time for crafting breathtaking content. Matrox Mojito 4K lets you finish your productions while monitoring up to 4Kp60 for Adobe Creative Cloud software.

Monitor up to 4Kp60

True 4Kp60

Unlike professional broadcast monitors that accurately display your video in full resolutions and with proper color representation, computer monitors don’t have the ability to show every pixel, nor can the system GPU account for color space conversions. Matrox Mojito 4K provides an editing and monitoring solution that supports true 4Kp60 so you know that what you see is what you are delivering.

compare video resolutions from SD to 4K

SD to 4K

Not every job is the same; you might shoot in 4K but need to deliver a 2K or even an HD version. Matrox Mojito 4K can monitor any finishing resolution including SD, HD, 2K, QFHD (Quad Full-HD), and 4K, so you can take on any job.

caliper measuring 10-bit color space

10-bit color precision

To accurately judge your video content when editing, it is best to view it in its native resolution and color space. Matrox Mojito 4K provides the highest quality video editing experience by outputting projects with 1:1 pixel accuracy and 10-bit color precision to the monitor.

Audio meters with volume amplitude

16 audio channels

Just like video deliverables change from job to job, so do your audio requirements. From multi-language projects to 7.1 surround mixes, Matrox Mojito 4K supports up to 16 channels of embedded audio. Choose from working with a simple stereo mix to surround sound and beyond for all your post-production needs.

Adobe Video Tools icons

4K editing for professionals

Editing is just one step in your post-production process. Acquiring your digital media, and adding graphics and special effects to your project are also key parts of a professional workflow. Matrox Mojito 4K provides monitoring for Adobe Premiere Pro CC, Adobe Prelude CC, Adobe Speed Grade CC, and Adobe Encore CC through the Adobe Transmit Engine. Matrox Mojito 4K also provides artists with WYSIWYG tools for Adobe After Effects CC and Adobe Photoshop CC, which let them see their work as the audience sees it.

Matrox MXO2 Dock

MXO2 Dock

Turn your Thunderbolt-enabled laptop into a full-blown edit suite!

Today’s MacBook Pro and MacBook Air are powerful enough for many Matrox MXO2 users but when you’re in the studio it would be nice to have more screen real estate to fuel your creative process. Matrox MXO2 Dock lets you enjoy the productivity benefits of your MXO2 and superior comfort of an affordable full-size HDMI display to complement your laptop display. In addition, it lets you get the most from your Thunderbolt port by letting you also add a full size keyboard, a mouse, an Ethernet network, USB 3.0 storage, and many other peripherals using a single cable.

Easily create your ideal ergonomic workspace!

 

One-cable convenience

Save time everyday—come and go without disconnecting and re-connecting all your devices. One Thunderbolt connection does it all. Tame the cables cluttering your desk and save
wear-and-tear on your laptop.

SuperSpeed USB 3.0

Matrox MXO2 Dock adds an easily accessible SuperSpeed USB 3.0 port to your system. Transfer data 10 times faster than standard USB 2.0.

Gigabit Ethernet for all

Matrox MXO2 Dock adds gigabit Ethernet access to laptops that do not have a built-in gigabit Ethernet port. Transfer data 18 times faster than WiFi and offload traffic from your WiFi network.

Expand your connectivity

In addition to the Host interface to connect your MXO2 I/O device, two USB 2.0 ports let you connect anything else you need—full-size keyboard and mouse, storage, optical drive, control surface, flash drive, and other peripherals.

Daisy chain setup

Matrox MXO2 Dock is the last device in your Thunderbolt chain. Conveniently positioning your Thunderbolt storage with pass-through between your laptop and your MXO2 Dock lets you easily remove just your laptop, or your laptop plus storage, with a single disconnection.

 

For more information about Matrox products, or to purchase, call (310) 922-1631 or

 

 

Matrox MXO2 Rack Max

SDI/HDMI/analog HD/SD video and complete audio I/O with direct 5.1 and 7.1 surround sound monitoring plus H.264 encoding acceleration

SDI/HDMI/analog HD/SD video and complete audio I/O
with direct 5.1 and 7.1 surround sound monitoring

Lightning fast H.264 encoding too!

Not only does Matrox MXO2 Rack MAX give you broadcast-quality input and output for your favorite editing app, it also turbocharges your H.264 encoding for deliveries to the web, mobile devices, and Blu-ray – all in a rackmountable unit.

Only Matrox I/O devices deliver H.264 video
up to 5 times faster without sacrificing quality

If you’re delivering H.264 content for the web, mobile devices, Apple TV, and Blu-ray discs, you know how painful it can be to wait for the long encoding times needed to create high-quality video files using software only. You might even be tempted to sacrifice quality for speed. With Matrox MXO2 Rack MAX, you no longer need to even consider making that trade off

 

 

 

For more information about Matrox products, or to purchase, call (310) 922-1631 or

Matrox MXO2 LE MAX

SDI/HDMI/analog HD/SD video and professional audio I/O

SDI/HDMI/analog HD/SD video and professional audio I/O
Lightning fast H.264 encoding too!

Not only does Matrox MXO2 LE MAX give you broadcast-quality input and output for your favorite editing app, it also turbocharges your H.264 encoding for deliveries to the web, mobile devices, and Blu-ray—all in a convenient, portable breakout box.

Only Matrox I/O devices deliver H.264 video
up to 5 times faster without sacrificing quality

If you’re delivering H.264 content for the web, mobile devices, Apple TV, and Blu-ray discs, you know how painful it can be to wait for the long encoding times needed to create high-quality video files using software only. You might even be tempted to sacrifice quality for speed. With Matrox MXO2 LE MAX, you no longer need to even consider making that trade off.

 

 

 

For more information about Matrox products, or to purchase, call (310) 922-1631 or

Matrox SMART I/O for Adobe CS6/CC, Avid Media Composer, and Final Cut Pro

Affordable HDMI/analog HD/SD video and audio I/O<br />
plus H.264 encoding acceleration

Affordable HDMI/analog video and audio I/O
Lightning fast H.264 encoding too!

Not only does Matrox MXO2 Mini MAX give you affordable HDMI and analog video and audio input and output for your favorite editing app, it also turbocharges your H.264 encoding for deliveries to the web, mobile devices, and Blu-ray – all in a convenient, portable breakout box.

Only Matrox I/O devices deliver H.264 video
up to 5 times faster without sacrificing quality

If you’re delivering H.264 content for the web, mobile devices, Apple TV, and Blu-ray discs, you know how painful it can be to wait for the long encoding times needed to create high-quality video files using software only. You might even be tempted to sacrifice quality for speed. With Matrox MXO2 Mini MAX, you no longer need to even consider making that trade off.

For more information on Matrox products, or to purchase, call (310) 922-1631 or

Orbital Enterprise Video Recording

90 Day Compliance Recording for 1 – 48 Channels

Cambridge Imaging Systems have partnered with leading storage vendor SGI to produce a world beating ‘one box’ compliance recording system. The solution can record between 1 and 48 channels for 90 days and supports both SD and HD channels.

Orbital software is preloaded on SGI’s Modular InfiniteStorage Server – a breakthrough storage server platform that delivers extreme density in a 3U chassis. The storage space available ensures that the entire broadcast stream as originally transmitted can be captured – including all EPG data – no need for downsampling or lost data.

Orbital software enables broadacasters or producers to review the transmitted content, export for further analysis, repurposing or editing, or simply to provide a copy to the broadcast regulator. Orbital also integrates seamlessly with Imagen2 making it possible to build up an online archive from broadcast material.

+ Simple ‘One Box’ solution

+ The complete transport stream is archived as broadcast

+ Preservation of all EIT (EPG) and subtitle data

+ Best of breed hardware with built in redundancy – (SGI and HP)

+ No down sampling of video or audio

+ Works with SD and HD streams – from Terrestrial and Satellite sources

+ Can capture encoded streams – not just off-air content

+ Works with a range of head end tuners and encoders

Orbital Software Components

+ CaptureServer

CaptureServer captures and writes the unmodified MPEG-2 transport streams to the storage RAID.

+ FeedServer

FeedServer manages the scheduling and maintains a database of event information created by monitoring the service information from the DVB broadcasts.

+ CaptureView

  • Up to the minute review of video and radio programmes
  • Select full programmes, small clips or any duration for export
  • Export full Transport stream
  • Export EPG metadata as XML
  • Grab images from video and save to desktop or clipboard

+ MediaPlan

  • Management interface for DVB-IP Gateways and Encoders
  • Set up recording schedules – full flexibility across date, time and channels
  • Wide range of support for Gateways and Encoders including HaiVision, CableTime and Teracue
For more information about Orbital, or to place an order, call (310) 922-1631